The Six Oldest Dubliners in the 1911 Census

December 5, 2007 at 1:43 am Leave a comment

The 1911 Census returns for Dublin are now online, and there is some fascinating information in them. I did a search for Dubliners who were 100 years old or more at the time of the Census, and found that there were six centenarians (or maybe five, as the writing on one form is ambiguous).

  • Two were women, including a 107-year-old widow living with her adopted son; and a 101-year-old patient in a Public Institution for Idiots and Lunatics.
  • Four were men, including a possibly 109 year-old retired civil servant living with a young ward and a servant; a 104-year-old widower living with his sister; a 101-year-old patient in a Hospital for the Dying; and a 100-year-old man living in a Workhouse for Paupers.

They had lived through most of the 1800s, seen the turn of the new century, and were now living out their last years as the six oldest people in Dublin. They were totally unaware that Ireland and the world was soon about to change utterly with the the Easter Rising and the First World War. Here are their details: >>>

Henry McGuinness, possibly 109

Henry Richard McGuinness is listed as 109 years old in the search results. However, his age on the written form is ambiguous, and he might have been 69 rather than 109. (Have a look yourself and see what you think). He lived in 213 Palace Terrace, Richmond Road, Drumcondra, with a 19-year-old ward, Florence Suter and a 20-year-old servant, Mary Niscon. He was born in Wexford, was a bachelor, a retired civil servant, and a member of the Church of Ireland.

Mary Byrne, 107

Mary Byrne was 107 years old. She lived in 30 Churchtown Lower in Milltown, Rathdown, with her 35-year-old adopted son, George, who was an agricultural labourer. She was born in Wicklow, and was a widow and a member of the Church of Ireland. Churchtown Lower was also the location of Lace School, a Church and the Central Lunatic Asylum.

William Carroll, 104

William Carroll was 104 years old. He lived in house number 4 in the townland of Clonskeagh in Donnybrook, with his 84-year-old sister Catherine, who was single. He was born in Wicklow, and was a widower and a Roman Catholic. There were only six houses in Clonskeagh at the time, with 29 people living there, all of them Roman Catholic.

Thomas Carroll, 101

Thomas Carroll was 101 years old. He lived in the Hospital of the Dying at 136 Harold’s Cross Road, which was in Rathmines & Rathgar West, Dublin. He was born in Kings County and was living in Dublin when admitted to the hospital, and was a married labourer with no children. The writing is hard to decipher, but he seems to have been sufferering from asthma for two years.

J. D., 101

J. D., a female, was 101 years old. She lived in a Public Institution for Idiots and Lunatics in house number 1.2 South Dublin Union in Usher’s Quay. She was born in Dublin, was single, had been a servant, and was a Roman Catholic. She had been committed to the Institution suffering from dementia. She was also blind. Unless I am reading the forms wrong, there seem to have been 3,817 patients in the Institution.

T. R., 100

T. R., a male, was 100 years old. He lived in a Workhouse for Paupers in house number 4.3 in Brunswick Street North, Arran Quay. He was born in Dublin, was single, had been a labourer, and was a Roman Catholic. At the time of the census, he had been hospitalised for a month with Senile Decry.

Nine at 99

And there were another nine Dubliners aged 99 who might have made this list if the Census had taken place the following year.

There is much more information available at the Census website, which has been put online by the National Archives of Ireland in partnership with Libraries and Archives Canada. It contains the digital equivalent of 4,000 reels of microfilm and 3.5 million images.

But, of course, you are going to start by searching for your own name. Do let us know if you find anything interesting.

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Entry filed under: Culture, Ireland.

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A blog by Michael Nugent

Welcome to my blog about living in the maddest country on earth. Please feel free to leave a comment.

I also write Bionic Bohs, a blog about following Bohemians football club in the 1970s.

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Bionic Bohs

As mentioned above, if you like Irish football and/or cultural nostalgia, I also write Bionic Bohs, a blog about following Bohs in the 1970s.

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