Ten Least Catholic Irish Cities and Counties

January 23, 2008 at 12:00 am Leave a comment

One in five Dubliners is not a Roman Catholic, and ten Irish cities or counties have less than the national average of Catholics. Here they are. >>>

Ten Least Catholic Irish Cities and Counties

  • 79.9% – Dublin City (506,211 people, 404,403 are Catholic)
  • 80.4% – County Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown (194,038 people, 156,066 Catholic)
  • 81.6% – Galway City (72,414 people, 59,083 are Catholic)
  • 81.7% – County Fingal (239,992 people, 196,007 are Catholic)
  • 81.8% – County Wicklow (126,194 people, 103,257 are Catholic)
  • 85.1% – County South Dublin (246,935 people, 210,160 are Catholic)
  • 86.3% – Waterford City (45,748 people, 39,483 are Catholic)
  • 86.3% – County Cavan (64,003 people, 55,253 are Catholic)
  • 86.4% – County Donegal (147,264 people, 127,258 are Catholic)
  • 86.7% – Cork City (119,418 people, 103,533 are Catholic)

The average for the State is 86.8% (approx 4.2m people, approx 3.7m Catholics).

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Culture, Ireland, Religion.

Ad for Fishy Slimming Pills is Still Banned Ten Most Catholic Irish Cities and Counties

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


A blog by Michael Nugent

Welcome to my blog about living in the maddest country on earth. Please feel free to leave a comment.

I also write Bionic Bohs, a blog about following Bohemians football club in the 1970s.

Feeds

Bionic Bohs

As mentioned above, if you like Irish football and/or cultural nostalgia, I also write Bionic Bohs, a blog about following Bohs in the 1970s.

%d bloggers like this: